HI-TECH

PUBLIC RELATIONS
MANUAL

©1988 Peter N. Budzilovich
Nyack, New York

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Peter N. Budzilovich
62 Washington Street
Nyack, New York 10960-3730
(845) 353-2238
pnbud@russia-talk.com
Skypename: pnbudzilovich

To:          Advertising & PR Managers, Marketing Executives, General Managers,
               Undergraduate and Graduate students
From:      Peter N. Budzilovich, author and copyright holder
Subject:   Hands-on “How to...” of Publicity

Consistent editorial coverage of your products and services can go a long way in boosting sales and company image. But how do you “make it happen?”
     This is where the “Hi-Tech Public Relations Manual” comes in — it will DETAIL exactly how good, hard-hitting, results-oriented Public Relations [“PR”] should be done (this is why it is called a “Manual”). It tells you what technical/industrial PR is all about, what methods and techniques you can use, and HOW it is done! In its quick close to 100 pages there is no “water,” no “general guidelines” — only specifics, backed-up in depth by detailed, easy-to-follow examples.
     The copyrighted in 1988 Manual has been compiled on the basis of my over 20-year PR experience, close to eight years editorial experience (with Electronic Design and Control Engineering), preceded by a 12-year engineering career. Every procedure presented in the Manual has been tested time-after-time “under actual operating conditions,” i.e., in the rough-and-tumble of providing full range of PR services for a variety of clients, see the PROFESSIONAL HIGHLIGHTS, below.
     While the Manual addresses “Hi-Tech PR,” various techniques and methodology therein apply across the PR spectrum, including the “financial PR.”
     To show you what you'll be getting, the complete Table of Contents follows. Quite appropriately, the Manual is in the format of a MANUAL — a close to 100-page spiral-bound booklet, 8-1/2" x 11".
     While the Manual packs uniquely practical “How to” information on PR that easily exceeds a four-year university course on “Marketing Communications” (and beats it hands-down in practicality), it is very modestly priced, see below.

HOW TO ORDER:

     The Manual is fully protected by U.S. copyright laws (1988) and is available directly from Pete Budzilovich as a web («HTML») file, either by e-mail, or on a self-starting CD by the U.S. Post Office, or as a 100-page, spiral-bound 8-1/2" x 11" booklet.
      To obtain your copy of the Manual, in single quantities, the e-mail version is $100.00. The CD version is $125.00. The 100-page, spiral-bound 8-1/2" x 11" booklet is $200.00. To order, please make out a check to «Peter N. Budzilovich» and send to 62 Washington St., Nyack, ?NY 10960-3730, U.S.A. Prices include S&H in the U.S. and Canada. Call or write for quantity discounts.
      Those who are in a rush, may send the payment via the Western Umion.
     Additional copies shipped to the same address are $100 each. Full-time students can obtain copies at a discount for $100 each, S&H included (in the U.S. and Canada).


PROFESSIONAL HIGHLIGHTS
for Peter N. Budzilovich

After graduating in 1957 from Massachusetts Institute of Technology with a BSEE and MSEE (awarded simultaneously after a five-year special course), he worked in the electronics industry until 1966. During this time, he served as a design engineer, engineering project manager, and as a marketing representative for various projects.
     In 1966, he joined the staff of Electronic Design, world's leading electronic magazine, as a technical editor. During the next three years, he wrote and edited articles on all aspects of semiconductors and circuit design. Under his leadership, the “Ideas-for-Design” column in the magazine became the most prestigious forum for airing sound engineering ideas.
     In 1968, Mr. Budzilovich joined the staff of Control Engineering as their semiconductor/electronics editor. Here again he edited and wrote a number of articles dealing with automatic controls, machine tools, CAD/CAM, etc.
     After leaving the magazine, in 1970 he formed a “Hi-Tech” public relations firm, Corporate/Technical Communications, Inc.
     In addition to serving clients, he continued writing in various electronic magazines under his own byline. For instance, he did several in-depth technology reports for Electronics (for a report on power supplies, see the June 16, 1981 issue, pp. 105-130; on switches, see the Sep. 22, 1983 issue, pp. 185-206). He was also listed on the Electronic Design's masthead as one of their “Contributing Editors” between 1972 and 1976.
     Since Mr. Budzilovich is fluent in technical and general Russian, he has been providing scientific interpreting services (simultaneous and consecutive) to the U.S. Department of State on a contract basis since 1973.
     Some of the companies that were served by him on retainer basis included Digital Equipment Corporation; Data General Corporation; Warner & Swasey Co.; Panasonic Industrial Company; Siemens Corporation (a U.S. Division); Thomas & Betts Corporation; DiAcro Division of Houdaille Corporation; and others.


Table of Contents

1. FOREWORD
2. WHAT IS PRODUCT/SERVICE PR
  2.1 Dealing with editors
3. PR IN YOUR OVERALL MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS EFFORT
4. MAJOR PR TOOLS
  4.1 News releases
      4.1.1 What is a news release?
      4.1.2 How your release is handled by a publication
      4.1.3 Editorial criteria for release acceptance
      4.1.4 Writing winning releases
      4.1.5 Gathering information for a new-product release
      4.1.6 Writing the headline
      4.1.7 Writing the body of the release
      4.1.8 Using the right release format
      4.1.9 Using the right photos
      4.1.10 Using line drawings
      4.1.11 Mailing releases – in-house or "out-house"?
      4.1.12 Following up your releases
      4.1.13 Understanding different types of releases
      4.1.14 Is your company ready for inquiries?
      4.1.15 How often releases should be sent out
  4.2 Editorial survey participation
      4.2.1 Keeping track of roundups
      4.2.2 Storing roundup data on a PC
      4.2.3 Using a PC in roundup servicing
      4.2.4 Using roundups as a door opener
      4.2.5 Who should make the roundup calls
   4.3 Major product introductions
      4.3.1 Methods for introducing a product
      4.3.2 A press conference – to hold or not to hold?
        4.3.2.1 Selecting hotel/room for a press conference
        4.3.2.2 Preparing a press kit
        4.3.2.3 Getting editors to attend your press conference
        4.3.2.4 Running the conference
        4.3.2.5 Press conference follow-up
      4.3.3 All about press briefings
        4.3.3.1 What is a press briefing
        4.3.3.2 Press briefing format and timing
      4.3.4 Getting front covers
      4.3.5 Taking a press tour
        4.3.5.1 Press tour – more than a product introduction
        4.3.5.2 Press tour follow-up
      4.3.6 Giving an exclusive
      4.3.7 Getting "industry exclusives"
      4.3.8 "Press conference in a box"
  4.4 Editorial liaison
      4.4.1 Editorial plant visits
      4.4.2 Presentations to editors
      4.4.3 Press conferences
      4.4.4 Hospitality suites
      4.4.5 "Experts" for interviews
      4.4.6 Letters to editors
  4.5 Technical articles
      4.5.1 Why technical articles are underused
      4.5.2 Getting technical articles done
      4.5.3 Getting engineers to write technical articles
      4.5.4 Selecting winning article themes
        4.5.4.1 The "How to select a ..." article
        4.5.4.2 The "technology" article
        4.5.4.3 Application or "case-history" article
        4.5.4.4 The "industry spokesman" article
        4.5.4.5 The "design" article
        4.5.4.6 The "Tech-Brief"
5. MAKING THE NEWS
6. SHOWING OFF YOUR DESIGN SKILLS
7. SERVICING REGULARLY SCHEDULED SPECIALS
8. RESPONDING TO EDITORIAL CALLS
9. GETTING ALL THE MILEAGE OUT OF TRADE SHOWS
  9.1 PR before a show
  9.2 During a show
  9.3 After a show
  9.4 Other show-related projects
10. PUBLICITY MARKETING AND FOLLOW-UP
  10.1 Putting reprints to work for you
10.2 To clip or not to clip
    10.2.1 Clipping service as a market-research tool
11. PROFESSIONAL SOCIETIES LIAISON
12. INTEGRATING PR AND ADVERTISING
13. STAFFING A PR OPERATION
  13.1 The ideal PR man
    13.2 Agency versus in-house PR
APPENDIX A – Press Guidelines
APPENDIX B – Author's Guide for Writing Technical Articles
 
About the author
 
Tables and illustrations
 
Table 1. Tools of publicity
Fig. 1 PR and advertising in a company organization
Fig. 2 Flow-chart, editorial criteria for news-release acceptance
Fig. 3 Questionnaire for gathering new product release information
Fig. 4 Sample format of a new product release
Fig. 5a Sample literature release for a data sheet
Fig. 5b Sample literature release for a catalog
Fig. 6 Roundup data format for easy follow-up
Fig. 7 Questionnaire for servicing roundups
Fig. 8 Flow chart, product introduction sequence
Fig. 9 Sample press conference invitation letter and an RSVP card
Fig. 10 Sample press briefing invitation
Fig. 11 Sample technical article outline
Fig. 12 Sample memo to field sales force soliciting case history leads
Fig. 13 Sample invitation to editors to visit your booth
Fig. 14 Sample list of possible editorial questions
Fig. 15 Milestone chart showing how PR and advertising can be integrated

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